FEMINIST FRIDAY

Haddon Musings

What do you call a woman who is the first African woman to win the New York Marathon only five years after getting her first pair of sneakers?  You call her Chametia (one who never gets annyoyed) or Tegla Loroupe.  Here is her medal-worthy story.

From running star to champion for peace, the story of Tegla Loroupe

By Paul Osborne
Tegla Loroupe is a real life role model. From her exploits on the road to her incredible humanitarian work off it, the Kenyan is a true ambassador to her country, her sport and mankind as a whole.

Born in Kapsait village, the Lelan division of West Pokot District, Kenya, Loroupe grew up with 24 siblings. She spent her childhood working fields, tending cattle and looking after younger brothers and sisters.

It was at the age of seven, when Loroupe began attending school, that her running prowess became immediately apparent. Attending…

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The house at Gallant Woods

witlessdatingafterfifty

Hopefully, this photograph for

Thursday’s Doors will bring

you peaceful, “easy” feelings.

Referring to the Eagles

song, as well as how a

tranquil setting gives

us a sense of normalcy,

in our tumultuous life.

This was taken on an early

evening in “the golden hour.”

I love how the sun brightens

and reflects while accentuating

details of whatever comes

into its light pathway.

This old farmhouse is

located on the same property

as last week’s door feature.

The red historical barn was

on Gallant Woods Preserve.

Here’s our door’s leader

and rodeo extroadinaire,

Norm Frampton’s link:

http://miscellaneousmusingsofamiddleagedmind.wordpress.com

If I had room on my walls,

this photograph would

become enlarged and

be displayed on my wall. . .

Let me know if anything is

elicited from your beautiful mind!

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Letters to the Power Plant #91 — Days at Dell

Power Plant Men

After I left the power plant and went to work for Dell on August 20, 2001, I wrote letters back to my friends at the plant letting them know how things were going.  This is the ninety first letter I wrote.  Keep in mind that at the time when I originally penned this letter I didn’t intend on it being posted online.

1/6/04 – Days at Dell

Dear Sooner Plantians and friends from up north,

A couple of weeks ago when I sent my last e-mail to you, I received back a notice that Gene Day’s e-mail address was no longer valid.  I thought that was rather strange, because I know Gene couldn’t have retired or anything.  After all, he was so old and had been around so long that he didn’t really work there anyway, did he?  I mean, wasn’t he just sort of a “plant mascot”?  —  I’m…

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Like The Second Avenue Subway? Remember The 3rd Avenue “El”

PenneyVanderbilt

Forget the Second Avenue subway—we’re obsessed with this elevated train on Third Avenue. In a new exhibit at the New York Transit Museum, there are vintage photos of the train from 1955, the year it closed. The photographer was Sid Kaplan, who was only 17 years old when he got these shots.

The aboveground railroad in Manhattan was like a High Line of the East Side and one of the four lines in Manhattan in the late 1800s. It eventually ran from the South Ferry terminal up to 113rd Street. The northern Bronx stations remained in service until 1973, but the rest of the railroad was demolished soon after its 1955 closure. Forget the Second Avenue subway—we’re obsessed with this elevated train on Third Avenue.  The photographer was Sid Kaplan, who was only 17 years old when he got these shots.

Feature image is East Village near Cooper Union

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